Tore Lærdal receives Royal Order of Merit

   

This past week, Tore Lærdal was conferred as a Knight of the First Class Royal Norwegian Order of Merit for his humanitarian service. This royal honour was in recognition of his efforts to reduce maternal and newborn mortality in low resource countries.

Instituted by King Olav V in 1985, the Order of Merit is bestowed on distinguished individuals who demonstrate outstanding service in the interest of Norway and humanity. Known for his tireless commitment to the company mission, Helping Save Lives, Tore Lærdal was nominated for the honour by Stein Tore Nilsen, Research Director of Stavanger University Hospital, and Marit Boyesen, Dean of the University of Stavanger.

Last Wednesday, at a ceremony held at SAFER (Stavanger Acute Medicine Foundation for Education and Research) in Stavanger, Tore Lærdal was presented with the Cross of St. Olav by the King of Norway's representative, Harald Thune, and will be met by King Harald V at a later date.

   

    

Else Søyland, Director of SAFER, said of Laerdal, "You dream big. You set the course and press forward. You motivate everyone around you with your mission of Helping Save Lives." 

From high-ranking politicians and lifelong colleagues and friends, to his youngest daughter, Ingrid, all shared a common theme in describing Lærdal as an inspiration to everyone who knows him. Lærdal was commended as both a leader and a visionary, a deeply engaged and dedicated champion of his mission, and a diplomatic problem-solver who has been able to accomplish what some consider to be "the impossible" in a short period of time with his endeavors in Laerdal Global Health.

But Laerdal Medical CEO, Clive Patrickson, noted that Laerdal's journey began long before Laerdal Global Health. For forty years, Tore Lærdal has built a company "stone by stone" into what is widely recognized, not only as a global industry leader, but as a company known for its unwavering commitment to the mission of Helping Save Lives. Laerdal's mission has been shared with 1400 people in 24 countries.

"From Japan to Australia, to the United States, today is a special day for our extended Laerdal family around the world who work together to help save lives, every day." Patrickson said.

 "Tore sets our values. He keeps us clear on our mission and does not waver. Laerdal is a company we are proud to be a part of and we are proud of Tore, as our leader and as a friend."

When Stavanger Aftenbladet referred to Tore Lærdal as the "Richest Knight," he was initially displeased with the tagline, but upon reflection, he agreed.

"I feel rich in people and colleagues," Tore Lærdal said, "rich in meaningful work, rich in experiences, and rich in possibilities."