By Matt Orr, 星条旗新聞(Stars and Stripes)
太平洋版、2010年4月6日火曜日 

キャンプ・ハンセン、沖縄―彼らの瞳孔は散大する。異常な呼吸パターンも再現可能だ。出血してショック状態に陥ることさえある。彼の命を救うことも可能だ。

シミュレータに寄せる期待としては大きすぎるかもしれないが、新たに設置された第3海兵遠征軍災害シミュレーションセンター(III Marine Expeditionary Force Casualty Simulation Center)のスタッフは、その最先端の装置に自信を持っている。

「ワイヤレスでコードに動きを制限されないシミュレータなので、どんな戦傷でもシミュレーションすることができます」。最近行われた海兵隊戦闘救命コースの最終日に、インストラクターの一等海曹(Petty Officer 1st Class)Jeremy Dunlapはこう話した。

9月に開設されたこのセンターでは、シミュレータが主要な教育ツールとなっており、シミュレータを用いた授業を2月より開始していると関係者は話す。

海軍・海兵隊でトレーニングのためにSimMan 3G を使用するのはこのセンターが初めてだと、関係者は言う。陸軍もこのシミュレータを使用している。

「戦場でカード(医療シナリオ)を配ると、みなヘッドライトに照らされた鹿のようにこちらを見てきます」。25年間衛生兵として従事し引退したインストラクターのMark Kaneはこう話す。「これにより、現実に即したトレーニング経験をすることができます。すべての事が行えるのです。」

Marines and sailors from Special Operations Training Group work on a manikin that is able to replicate real life day of testing for a weeklong course designed to reinforce and teach battle injuries. The SOTG Marines and sailors were undergoing their final life-saving skills they may encounter on a battlefield.生徒らが作業している間、インストラクターはシミュレータのバイタルサインを変更し、生徒らに迅速な判断をさせますと、KaneとDunlapは話している。

「わたしたちは海兵隊員に[失血]、胸部外傷、気道管理の3つの主要な戦傷について教えています」。Dunlapはこう話し、衛生兵が常にいるわけではないと説明している。「このコースは海兵隊員が仲間に針を刺さなければいけなくなる前に自信を持たせることを目的としています。」

「トレーニングは非常にリアルです」。トレーニングを受け、近く配属されるJasper Ryan海曹(Sgt.)はこう話している。「間違いなく戦場で命を救うことができるでしょう。」

使用される場合には星条旗新聞から許可を得てください。©2010 Stars and Stripes. 写真提供 Matt Orr /星条旗新聞

(上段写真)一等海曹Jeremy Dunlap(左)と退役した元海軍衛生兵Mark Kane(左から2枚目)が、医療シミュレーションシナリオにてシミュレータの治療を終えた特殊作戦訓練グループ(Special Operation Training Group)の海兵隊と海軍軍人にブリーフィングを行っている。

(中段写真)特殊作戦訓練グループの海兵隊と海軍軍人が、兵士らの強化と戦傷に関する教育を目的とした1週間のコースで実際の困難な状況を再現できるシミュレータに処置を行っている。SOTGの海兵隊と海軍軍人が、戦場で遭遇するかもしれない最終救命手段のスキルを実行しているところ。

(下段写真)一等海曹Jeremy Dunlap(左)が、医療シミュレーションシナリオにてシミュレータの治療を終えた特殊作戦訓練グループの海兵隊と海軍軍人にブリーフィングを行っている。これらのシミュレータは実際の生体反応を再現できる。Petty Officer 1st Class Jeremy Dunlap (left) briefs Marines and sailors from Special Operation Training Group after they finished treating a mannequin during a medical simulation scenario. The mannequins are able to replicate real life responses.

By Matt Orr, Stars and Stripes
Pacific edition, Tuesday, April 6, 2010 

CAMP HANSEN, Okinawa — Their pupils can dilate. They can replicate abnormal breathing patterns. They can bleed and even go into shock.

They can also help save lives.

That’s a lot to ask of a manikin, but the staff of the newly opened III Marine Expeditionary Force Casualty Simulation Center is confident in its state-of-the-art gear.

“They are wireless, tetherless manikins that can simulate any battle injury that we give it,” instructor Petty Officer 1st Class Jeremy Dunlap said during the final day of a recent combat life-saving course for Marines.

The SimMan 3G manikins cost $65,000 each. They are the main teaching tool at the center, which opened in September. Classes with the manikins began in February, officials said.

The center is the first in the Navy and Marine Corps to use the SimMan 3G manikins for training, officials said. The Army also uses them.

“If you give a guy in the field a [medical scenario] card, they look at you like a deer in the headlights,” said Mark Kane, an instructor who retired from the Navy after serving 25 years as a corpsman. “With this, you get a realistic training experience. This thing does it all.”

While the students are working, instructors can change the manikins’ vital signs, making the students think on their feet, Kane and Dunlap said.

“We teach the Marines the three major war wounds — [blood loss], chest injuries and airway management,” Dunlap said, explaining that a corpsman is not always available. “The course is designed to build confidence in the Marines before they have to stick their buddy.”

“The training is very realistic,” said Sgt. Jasper Ryan, who has undergone the training and will deploy soon. “It will definitely save lives on the battlefield.”

Used with permission from the Stars and Stripes. ©2010 Stars and Stripes. Photos by Matt Orr / Stars and Stripes

(Top Photo) Petty Officer 1st Class Jeremy Dunlap (left) and retired Navy Corpsman Mark Kane (second from left) briefs Marines and sailors from Special Operation Training Group after they finished treating a manikin during a medical simulation scenario.

(Middle photo) Marines and sailors from Special Operations Training Group work on a manikin that is able to replicate real life day of testing for a weeklong course designed to reinforce and teach battle injuries. The SOTG Marines and sailors were undergoing their final life-saving skills they may encounter on a battlefield. 

(Bottom photo) Petty Officer 1st Class Jeremy Dunlap (left) briefs Marines and sailors from Special Operation Training Group after they finished treating a mannequin during a medical simulation scenario. The mannequins are able to replicate real life responses.